Finding ‘Love’ in China: An Overview of Chinese Marriage Markets (BaiFaXiangQin)

Finding ‘Love’ in China: An Overview of Chinese Marriage Markets (BaiFaXiangQin)

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Yangfan Zou — Exploring Chinese pragmatism—Matchmaking Corner

While not expecting many customers, Wang was surprised by the end of the day at how many parents came seeking her matchmaking services. The matchmaking corner at Revolution Park is well known to locals. It is held every Wednesday and Sunday and is a site devoted to matching unmarried women and men.

The so-called Matchmakers’ Corner has seen tens of thousands of Chinese parents, including members of my own family, come to investigate.

But since June , a corner of the park has also become a market-like place, serving as a venue for parental matchmaking on weekends and national holidays. They sit patiently, waiting for other parents to make inquiries about their children. Intimate lives in China have recently recaptured scholarly attention. This is rather intriguing given the male-biased sex ratio in the population. It is widely accepted that by , men outnumbered women in every cohort under the age of thirty.

It is men, not women, who are more likely never to marry in every age group. Then who are these women whose marriage status so concerns their parents? Most are company employees, civil servants or professionals such as accountants, lawyers, and research fellows. The expansion of higher education and the emergence of middle-class jobs resulting from market reforms have enabled these young women to develop careers and lifestyles that are compatible with their talents and economic status.

Compared to women in the same age group but with less education, these middle-class women tend to get married slightly later, but not that they do not get married at all. Although the term surplus men co-exists with surplus women, the latter appears much more frequently in everyday usage. Most recently, this line of argument resurfaced during national debates in focused on how economically independent urban women with good educations had intensified competition for the best professional and white-collar jobs, creating more pressure on men seeking those positions.

Matchmaking and marriage in modern China

Chinese culture has been imperative in ensuring that youth marry in their 20s or early 30s for financial stability and to maintain a traditional family structure. But during the s, unmarried somethings were left with a dilemma as they arrived in droves in metropolitan regions, leading local governments to organize social gatherings and registration services to streamline the matchmaking process. Arranged blind dating has prevailed as the preferred mode of matchmaking by parents across China.

Matchmaking in Modern China. Assignment. Lucy Ash reports on China’s gender imbalance which will leave 24 million bachelors looking for love by

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China’s Marriage Markets

Please click here if you are not redirected within a few seconds. Matchmaking corner in china. China matchmaking show host They’re china’s economic rise of.

The traditional Tinder: Why matchmaking families flock to Shanghai’s With more men than women in China, many parents are eager to find a.

Traditionally, families had more say in regard to a marriage than the man and woman who were getting married. In the old days, young men and women that liked one another were not allowed to meet freely together. Young people who put their wishes for a mate above the wishes of their parents were considered immoral. The goal of matchmakers ever since has usually been to pair families of equal stature for the greater social good. Marriages have traditionally been regarded as unions between families with matches being made by elders who met to discuss the character of potential mates and decide whether or not a they should get married.

Marriages that are arranged to varying degrees are still common and traditional considerations still plays a part in deciding who marries whom. Rich men could have as many wives as they could afford. Many marriages were worked out when the bride and groom were still children. Occasionally this occurred before they were born if two families were intent on forming a union. A traditional Chinese marriage was often set up by a matchmaker hired by the parents when potential bride and groom reached marriageable age.

In their search, the matchmakers took various things into consideration: education, family background, and a kind of fortunetelling based on year, date and time of birth.

Finding the other half: How Chinese parents are matchmaking

Larisa Epatko Larisa Epatko. The parents chat with each other about the attributes they — or rather, their children — are looking for in a mate. This phenomenon developed organically more than a decade ago in Shanghai and has since sprung up in other parts of China, said Zhen Trudy Wang, a former Caijing magazine reporter in Shanghai who now works for a public relations firm.

Marriage markets–perhaps more accurately called “matchmaking corners,” since no money is exchanged–are public spaces where parents.

When Chinese parents play matchmaker and pick spouses for their children, the resulting marriages are likely to be unhappy, according to newly published research from the World Bank. The reason for the unmerry marriages is that parents put their own needs for elderly care ahead of love, say researchers. They also seek submissive mates who will happily tend to chores, boosting household productivity, the report said.

Researchers surveyed 3, rural couples and 3, urban couples in seven provinces across China in While the data might be old, said Colin Xu, one of the authors, parental influence remains important in Chinese culture. Traditionally arranged marriages in which children have no say in their marital fate are no longer as prevalent in current-day China, but Mr. Xu said Chinese parents still tend to be heavy-handed in the match-making process.

Anecdotally, children across China feel the pressure of rising healthcare costs and the lack of investment vehicles, so some end up acquiescing to economics-driven marriages. That said, even in the U. The number of couples who filed for divorce in climbed That compares to around , in , according to the National Bureau of Statistics. The research said parent-patched marriages yield in higher income for couples in urban areas.

Xu said. A vendor lights a rose with a torch for customers at a flower market in Kunming, Yunnan province.

Shanghai marriage market

BEIJING — You are a young Chinese man whose father tells you the most important skill his future daughter-in-law must have is caring for her home and family. Your mother rejects a year-old woman as your potential mate because she may be too old to bear children. A Weibo page for the show has been visited million times, and the first three episodes had more than million views online.

Dating shows are not new in China.

Ever since ancient times, there has been a popular saying in China that Only after a matchmaker’s introduction and when parents considered.

What do you work as? They come here every weekend, rain or shine, seeking a partner for their grown-up son or daughter. Age, wage, height, education — everyone has a wish list, and they also condense their own child into such a list. In Britain, parents might fret; perhaps say a prayer or two. Then they sit and wait. They sit like fishermen, with collapsible stools and Thermos flasks to keep them going for an eight-hour shift. This is not their first rodeo. Each child is advertised with the aid of a colourful umbrella, lying open on its side and a sheet of A4 containing the all-important dating profile.

China’s singles look for love in many different ways


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